Book Now
banner

Giewont

Zakopane
Summer Activities
Winter Activities
Ski Slopes for beginners
Auschwitz-Birkenau
Bialka Tatrzanska
COS
Giewont
Jurgow
Gubalowka
Karol Szymanowski Museum
Kasprowy Wierch
Krakow
Kulig
Morskie Oko
Nosal
Rysy
Szymoszkowa
Tatra
Wieliczka Salt Mine
Krupowki Street - Pedestrian Zone
Giewont

Giewont

Giewont is a mountain in the Tatra Mountains of Poland, and is about 1,895 metres high.

There are three peaks (all in meters):

  • Small Giewont - (Polish Mały Giewont, 1,728 m)
  • Great Giewont - (Wielki Giewont, 1,895 m)
  • Long Giewont - (Długi Giewont, 1,867 m).

There is a mountain pass located between Great and Long Giewont, known as Szczerba (1,823 m). It is located between the valleys of Kondratowa, Małej Łąki and Strążyska. Long Giewont and Great Giewont are situated at a higher altitude than the nearby town of Zakopane.

On Great Giewont, there is a 15 m steel cross that is the site of many religious pilgrimages. Please consider that it can be very stormy in this height and this can be very dangerous, especially for non-hikers.

Geologically, Giewont is composed of dolomite and limestone caves, as well as gneiss and granite in the southern section.

The first recorded ascent to Giewont's summit was undertaken in 1830 by Franciszek Herbich and Aleksander Zawadzki (the 19th century explorer. The first winter ascent of Giewont occurred in 1904 by a group of five mountaineers led by Mariusz Zaruski.

In Polish folklore it is associated with a legend about oversleeping knights, who will awake when Poland is in danger. The profile of the mountains is similar to a lying knight, wherein the Long Giewont is the knight's torso, and the Great Giewont is the knight's face as viewed from the side (the three 'peaks' being the chin, the nose, and the eyebrow). The image of Giewont as viewed from the north makes the profile easy to discern.